A Theatre Buff Reviews On A First Name Basis

An older friend of mine once declared that, “If at the end of your days you can count true friends on the fingers of one hand, you are a lucky man.” David Kilbride, the author/employer in On A First Name Basis doesn’t have such luck. He pays his ‘friends’; they’re on his payroll…his agent, his publisher, his lawyer and his business manager. The one employee he sees every day, his housekeeper, doesn’t make that list. David doesn’t even know her first name after twenty-eight years of service.

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Norm Foster and Lally Cadeau in On A First Name Basis. Photo by BankoMedia.

Her name is Lucy, by the way: Lucy Hopperstaad (Lally Cadeau). David learns this detail after he has insisted that she stay one evening as she prepares to leave. Through a humorously uncomfortable, witty, and insightful conversation, David and Lucy explore the themes of relationships and death…over several glasses of single malts and Chablis.

Because my husband volunteers as a set builder, we both take note of the set as we settle in before a play begins. This one represents the gracious, well-appointed home of a wealthy man. The ceilings are sixteen feet high; the wood panelling is smooth and dark; mill work abounds; the wing-back chairs  are tufted leather. But I wondered, as I ‘watched’ the play through two sets of sunglasses and often with closed eyes if it was all necessary (I’m managing another concussion!). Like Ravi Jain’s interpretation of David French’s play, Saltwater Moon, that is just wrapping up in Toronto, this play has a captivating back and forth dialogue. A beautiful set may be superfluous.

I saw the play opening night. The leading man, due to illness, was replaced by no other than the playwright Norm Foster. It had to have been very satisfying for Mr. Foster to volley lines with the leading lady, (to whom he had given the best ones!). On A First Name Basis is a fine play; it entertains as it niggles at one’s conscience.

On A First Name Basis is playing at Theatre Aquarius in Hamilton until November 11, 2017.

Bonnie Lendrum is the author of Autumn’s Grace, the story of how one family manages the experience of palliative care with hope and humor despite sibling conflicts, generational pulls and career demands. Autumn’s Grace is a powerful commentary on the need for well-organized and well-funded palliative care in private homes and in residential hospices. It’s a gift to families and friends who would like to be prepared as they help fulfill the final wishes of someone they love. 

A Theatre Buff Reviews Androcles And The Lion

Cast of Androcles and The Lion - Photo by David Cooper

Cast of Androcles And The Lion – Photo by David Cooper

The Shaw Festival’s  Androcles And The Lion is a delightful production. It’s fun, interactive, and can leave one with the impression that it’s improvisational at points. However, the impression of improv theatre is just that; these actors know their material to its core.

The premise of the play is taken from a classical folktale whereby a runaway Roman slave, Androcles, relieves a wounded lion of the thorn in his paw and then benefits from the lion’s hunting prowess. Throw in George Bernard Shaw’s variations to the story to advance his views on religion, politics and vivisection, and the play becomes a comedy.  Androcles (Patrick Galligan) is a Christian and a vegetarian; the Christians being rounded up for death in the Colosseum are happy people who routinely break into song; the Roman centurion (Shawn Wright) is a buffoon; the Captain of the Roman Guard (Kyle Blair) has fallen in love with Lavinia (Julia Course), a beautiful and devout Christian; and Ferrovius (Jeff Irving) a muscled young Christian fighter struggles to reconcile his violent tendencies with his  faith.

The play becomes interactive when members of the audience change the momentum of the story by tossing coloured balls onto the set, and change the direction of the action by re-designing the set. I saw a preview; it was superb. It’s one more example of the energy at Shaw this year under the directorship of Tim Carroll.

Androcles And The Lion is playing at the Court House Theatre until October 7, 2017.

Bonnie Lendrum is the author of Autumn’s Grace, the story of how one family manages the experience of palliative care with hope and humor despite sibling conflicts, generational pulls and career demands. Autumn’s Grace is a powerful commentary on the need for well-organized and well-funded palliative care in private homes and in residential hospices. It’s a gift to people who would like to be prepared as they help fulfill the final wishes of a family member or friend. 

A Theatre Buff Reviews The School For Scandal

Juicy bits of information, true or false, have always been hard to resist and easy to pass on. Such schadenfreude is the driving creative force in Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s School For Scandal.

Geraint Wyn Davies as Sir Peter Teazle and Shannon Taylor as Lady Teazle. Photo by Lynda Churilla

Geraint Wyn Davies as Sir Peter Teazle and Shannon Taylor as Lady Teazle. Photo by Lynda Churilla

It’s a play that was written in the 18th century, but is timely for the 21st. If one changed the set to Manhattan condos, the costumes to modern day dress, the dialogue and intrigue would work equally well. To say that the satire delivers is an understatement; it’s witty, fast-paced and entertaining.

The play begins as Lady Sneerwell is literally finishing her morning toilette while being visited by a journalist, named Snake, who is both feared and admired for her malicious and salacious society column. There’s a game afoot. Lady Sneerwell is trying to secure the hand of Maria, for her friend, Joseph Surface, who (on the surface) is a thoughtful young man. However, Maria, the wealthy ward of Sir Peter Teazle is beloved by Joseph’s somewhat dissipated (on the surface) brother Charles. If Lady Sneerwell is successful, she will deny Maria’s hand to Charles and entrap him for herself.

This intrigue is set within two others: the travails of a May-December marriage (Sir Peter and Lady Teazle’s) that has lost its bloom, and an inheritance that the Surface brothers expect to receive from an elderly uncle, Sir Oliver. Throw in Rowley, a family manservant, who manoeuvres behind the scenes and the evening is set for intrigue and hilarity as loyalty and love are tested.

The play is set in a series of elegantly appointed rooms in the homes of Lady Sneerwell, Sir Peter Teazle, and Joseph Surface. Charles’ home, however, looks like an 18th century bachelor pad of a man who is on his last farthing, which is the case. Costumes are lush for both men and women.

I attend the Stratford Festival expecting excellence and I have yet to be disappointed. The teamwork that makes these productions possible speaks of a commitment to craft and polish. And for someone like me who took only one (obligatory) university English course, the excellent program notes are essential reading

School For Scandal is playing at the Stratford Festival in the Avon Theatre until October 21st.

Characters referenced in this review: Lady Sneerwell (Maev Beaty), Snake (Ansuree Roy), Maria (Monica Peter), Joseph Surface (Tyrone Savage), Sir Peter Teazle (Geraint Wyn Davies), Charles Surface (Omar Alex Khan), Lady Teazle (Shannon Taylor), Sir Oliver Surface (Joseph Ziegler) and Rowley (Brent Carver).

Bonnie Lendrum is the author of Autumn’s Grace, the story of how one family manages the experience of palliative care with hope and humor despite sibling conflicts, generational pulls and career demands. Autumn’s Grace is a powerful commentary on the need for well-organized and well-funded palliative care in private homes and in residential hospices. It’s a gift to people who would like to be prepared as they help fulfill the final wishes of a family member or friend.